Posted in Inspirational, Medical

The crucifix of our body

Jesus Christ is the image of the invisible God, the firstborn over all creation. For by him all things were created: things in heaven and on earth, visible and invisible, whether thrones or powers or rulers or authorities; all things were created by him and for him. He is before all things, and in him, all things hold together. 1 Colossians 1:15-17.

When we look at the vast universe, ever expanding with galaxies, stars, asteroids, comets, planets, and other heavenly bodies we are amazed at Gods creations.  Are we no less amazed at the creations on earth?  Have you ever wondered what the glue was that held our skin on our bodies, muscles and ligaments, nerves and cells together? I found out today in church that the glue is a protein molecule named Laminin. What is unique about this protein is the shape it takes on itself.  It is a crucifix, a symbol of the cross of biblical days of capital punishment. It is also in the heavens known as the Crux Constellation.  God gave us this symbol hidden in our bodies to the naked eye (invisible) yet providing an essential function within our bodies, notwithstanding, if we did not have this miracle protein we would not exist as human beings.

Since God created mankind we have yet to fully understand all the molecular and electrical fields of our brains and consciousness though we have made great strides in both areas of study.  Why did God create the Laminin in the shape of a cross? I think it is so that we humans can be amazed by science and prompted to theologize the significance of finding something so small to be of great worth.  Just like discovering the Crux Constellation is a reminder of the crucifix- a symbol that God created the heavens and the earth.

 

Image result for laminin

Laminin – Wikipedia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Laminin
Laminins are high-molecular-weight (~400 to ~900 kDa) proteins of the extracellular matrix. They are a major component of the basal lamina (one of the layers of the basement membrane), a protein network foundation for most cells and organs.

InterPro: IPR009254   Symbol: Laminin_I
Pfam: PF06008
Function · Pathology · Use in cell culture · Laminin domains

The Crux Constellation

Image result for crux constellation origin

 

 

 

 

Posted in Blog or Stories, Medical

Two Chin Man

When I was six, we went to visit Aunt Hazel in Anniston, Alabama. Her daughter Martha Louise had just married a Child Psychiatrist and the groom wanted to evaluate all of us children. My brother went in first and came back out and said that the doctor had double chins. My sister went in and also came back telling me that the doctor had two chins. Curious as I was, I began to ask questions. Does the doctor have two mouths? Does the doctor have two noes above the two chins or are they side by side? How does he eat with two chins? Does it hurt to have two chins? My brother and sister kept answering my questions until finally, it was my turn to see the doctor.

I went in and was told to sit in this huge leather chair.  I was fixated on looking at the doctor for his two chins. To my disappointment, I didn’t see two chins, or a double chin, or two mouths. I squint my eyes and tried to see if I had missed something that would let me see his two chins.

But, he only had one nose and this huge hole in his chin that looked like an actor Kirk Douglas on T.V. I don’t remember any questions the doctor asked me, he had me draw some pictures and color the pre-drawn picture which was a little fun. When I went back to my sister and brother, I replied with chagrin, “you guys are crazy, the doctor doesn’t have two chins!” They broke out into hysterical laughter.

Kat Challis

 

Posted in Medical

Fun Facts about LLAMAS

Chapter 5 Quick Facts about Llamas see Picture and Key

quick llama facts

QUICK facts about Llama’s

Names of llama body parts: 1 Ears – 2 Poll – 3 Withers – 4 Back – 5 Hip – 6 Croup – 7 Base of tail – 8 Tail – 9 Buttock – 10 Hock – 11 Metatarsal gland – 12 Heel – 13 Cannon bone – 14 Gaskin – 15 Stifle joint – 16 Flank – 17 Barrel – 18 Elbow – 19 Pastern – 20 Fetlcok – 21 Knee – 22 Chest – 23 Point of shoulder – 24 Shoulder – 25 Throat – 26 cheek or jowl – 27 Muzzle

Note: The term camel is also used more broadly to describe any of the six camel-like creatures in the family Camelidae: the two true camels, and the four South American camelids, the llama, alpaca, guanaco, and vicu

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The Science Connection

A Llama’s Body

Commonly unknown, llamas do not have eyelashes. However, their cousin the alpaca do.
The ears are rather long and slightly curved inward, characteristically known as “banana” shaped.
There is no (dorsal) back hump.
Feet are narrow, the toes being more separated than in the camels, each having a distinct plantar pad.
The tail is short
(Hair) Fiber is long, woolly and soft.
They have three stomach compartments, which means they eat a lot of food.
They graze on grass; eat Feed made up of protein, wheat, rye, corn. They love coastal hay, Alfalfa hay, and carrots. They also like horse treats.
Babies are known as Crias

A cria (pronounced Cree-ah) is the name for a baby llama
Crias are typically born with the whole herd gathering around in an attempt to protect against potential predators.
Most births take place between 8 a.m. and noon, during the relatively warmer daylight hours.
Crias are up and standing, walking and attempting to nurse within the first hour after birth.
Behavior
Llamas which are well-socialized and trained to halter and lead after weaning is very friendly and pleasant to be around.
They are extremely curious and most will approach people easily.
The manner in which treat each other is characterized by bouts of spitting, kicking and neck wrestling.
When correctly reared spitting at a human is a rare thing.
Llamas are very social herd animals, however, and do sometimes spit at each other as a way of disciplining lower-ranked llamas in the herd.
A llama’s social rank in a herd is never permanent. They can always move up or down in the social ladder by picking small fights.
This is usually done between males to see who becomes alpha.
Their fights are visually dramatic with spitting, ramming each other with their chests, neck wrestling and kicking, mainly to knock the other off balance.
The females are usually only seen spitting as a means of controlling other herd members.
While the social structure might always be changing, they live as a family and they do take care of each other.
If one notices a strange noise or feels threatened, a warning bray is sent out and all others come to alert.
They will often hum to each other as a form of communication.
The sound of the llama making groaning noises or going “mwa” is often a sign of fear or anger.
If a llama is agitated, it will lay its ears back.
Guard Behavior

Using Llamas as livestock guards in North America began in the early 1980s and some sheep producers have used llamas successfully for that entire time.
The ideal guard animal should protect sheep against predators while requiring minimal training, care, and maintenance.
A variety of guard animals currently in use include dogs, donkeys, kangaroos, ostriches, and llamas.
Llama should remain in a small area until the sheep and llama seem well-adjusted and attached to each other. This encourages bonding between the sheep and llama.
Fiber
Llamas also have a fine undercoat which can be used for handicrafts and garments.
The coarser outer guard hair is used for rugs, wall-hangings and lead ropes.
The fiber comes in many different colors ranging from white, grey, reddish brown, brown, dark brown and black.
This article incorporates text from the article “Llama” in the Encyclopedia Britannica, Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain on Wikipedia.

We hope that you have enjoyed learning about Llamas. Please look for more antic’s in the Adventures of RJ the Llama and his animal family.

Posted in Inspirational

A little effort can mean allot

Tonight, a very nice lady needed an ACC Request for her HOA requirements to get a shed installed on her property. She brought it by to have me check and make sure she had everything needed- she did!  I’m on the HOA Board of Directors. She didn’t have a home computer (gasp!) and was going to have to send the request snail mail (eek!).

Well, I have a scanner and computer and volunteered to scan and send them to her. She was very appreciative of a fifteen-minute process, and I was happy knowing she genuinely needed the assistance in order to get a timely board decision.

In the meanwhile, I got to talk to the neatest, coolest, a lady who shares my faith in the Lord.  It’s refreshing to talk to someone of like-mindedness who is genuine that she really believes what she is telling me about GOD.  She wasn’t trying to score points or have a secret agenda, she just wanted to see if she could pray for healing for my knee replacement surgery on Oct 26th. I welcome all prayers, as I have been told it is a tenacious surgery and pain filled recovery. The good side is once I get through the first two months of rehabilitation I should be able to walk more distances than my current limited walking. The tremendous pain that I endure discourages walking, bending, stooping, etcetera; which in turns makes my legs very weak upon standing and walking. I am hoping for improved quality of life with the surgery- let us hope I am right.

#appreciation #thank you #surgery #Lord

Update:  I had both knees replaced and four and six months respectively I am walking great and feeling like a new person.

 

Posted in Medical

Conversion disorder- Pseudoseizures

What people say about nonepileptic seizures

  1. People tell you that you are acting crazy.
  2. They tell you to snap out of it
  3. They accuse you of attention-getting
  4. They tell you that you can stop the nonsense of shaking with a positive attitude.
  5. They tell you it’s all in your head and you could stop them if you really wanted to.

What is it like to have a nonepileptic seizure disorder?

 1. You may feel as though you are acting crazy or irresponsible.

2. You feel guilty, humiliated, and embarrassed all at the same time. (apologies often follow seizures to those around you)

3. You feel anxious, then hold on for the ride (shaking or intense staring)

4. You are cognitive throughout the seizure and recover quickly, although feelings of fatigue accompany the thrashing about.

5. You just want to get to the bottom of the issue and get it stopped.

6. You may feel as if there is no hope to stop the anxiety that is causing the issue.

7. you may think you don’t need talk therapy or a psychologist to help you cope.

My Story:

I had pseudoseizures from 1995-2001. My father-in-law passed away from Cancer and I couldn’t accept the suffering he went through, and I had Post-traumatic-stress-disorder from childhood memories haunting me. When my husband moved me away from the graveyard access and the cause of the childhood issues, I began to get better. I had an awesome psychiatrist who treated my symptoms until his death in March 2017.

I visited a new psychiatrist, and the first thing he did was remove the Lexapro anxiety medication from my list. He did not replace it with another medication but had me go cold turkey from it. The pseudoseizures resumed in earnest. Currently, I just finished the visual 72hr EEG. I know they didn’t find anything conclusive since I was in bed & chair rest for the 3 days while I was being videoed. I betcha they comeback with pseudoseizures as a diagnosis.

Even happy occasions can trigger the pseudoseizure. I was at my 40th wedding anniversary party, passing our gifts over to my husband and BOOM! a seizure hits fast and hard, I am embarrassed. My mom is holding my head still and praying over me. My husband and friend are holding me in the chair. Soon it is over and we pick up where we left off. I feel embarrassed by the negative attention I just received. Negative in that it was not wanted or sought out after but was administered by frightened people.

Heat, Humidity, or Activities can overtax your mind and cause stress that can lead to pseudoseizures. Just trying to get the grocery shopping done and put away can trigger an anxiety attack. Or shopping in an overheated store, or being in physical pain can be a trigger. It doesn’t have to be an unresolved past history to be a trigger. I think mine is because I do feel anxious about everyday things, like unload and reload the dishwasher or washing machine, then add a list of other chores that need to be done and BANG! another seizure hits. I believe that if the doctor would put me back on an anxiety medication the symptoms would go away again.

Three weeks later: I am on anti-anxiety and anti-seizure medication once again and I haven’t had any seizure activity. At the most, I’m stemming (compulsive repetitive action) with my hands shaking or rubbing my cheek. I know when that begins I need to calm down, usually, I’m over-focusing on some project or activity and my brain is telling me to take a rest.

The downside it cost me 20% of the $15,000.00 bill to determine I needed to go back on the same medication Dr. Reddy took me off of. What a waste of money, time, and effort on everyone’s part.